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Reviewed: 3D Prophet DDR-DVI
Manufacturer: Hercules (subdivision of Guillemot)
Product Type: Videocard
ESP: $250
Required System: P166MHz, 32MB RAM, AGP2X
Reviewer's System: C400MHz @ 450MHz, 128MB RAM, Vortex2, DX7.0a, Win98
Overall Rating:
Author: Chris Kim       Date: July 4th, 2000
Page: 1

3D Prophet DDR-DVI

Product Review:

There have been countless videocards released over the past several years. The crown of performance and quality has been passed on and different technologies have come and gone. Computers have gone through various phases in videocards, 2D adapters, 2D accelerators, 3D adapters, and then onto 3D accelerators. Each phase has brought in various technologies that have been accepted to the computer community in various ways in accordance to how well that product performed. There were always those that were top performers and then those that were at the lowly bottom of the chain. One company that has always been on top of things has been NVIDIA ever since the beginning of their short-life since the initial release of their RIVA 128 chipset.

NVIDIA has always been at the top of the performance peak in terms of 3D gaming and will likely keep this throne for the foreseeable future. Since the verge of their history changing RIVA TNT chipset, they've never looked back to see what they left behind once they became the performance king. The following generations of the TNT chipset was the Vanta, TNT2, TNT2 Pro, TNT2 Ultra, TNT2 M64, and GeForce 256. Although only three of those chipset reach mainstream, they were all solid products that delivered for the cost-effective solution. Their current generation rests on the new, GeForce DDR chipset.

The Front
The Back
The RAM

The GeForce DDR chipset is essentially the GeForce 256 chipset with DDR-RAM, otherwise known as Double Data Rate (DDR)-RAM. The biggest limitation of the GeForce 256 chipset was its memory bandwidth and not the chipset not producing enough power. There was no easy solution as to how to fix this, but DDR memory was the first step towards solving this issue. It theoretically doubles the memory bandwidth available to the videocard to pump out all the information that the GeForce 256 was capable.

Enter Guillemot, a large videocard manufacturer based in Canada, a rather large competitor in the videocard business with a respected name and product line. Factor in Hercules, a subdivision of Guillemot, which produces all of Guillemot's videocards. Hercules has always been known to produce quality videocards ever since the advent of their Dynamite TNT videocard which ran faster and more stable than any other TNT-based product out there. They continued this with the fastest TNT2 card out there. Can their 3D Prophet DDR-DVI continue this trend?

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Added:  Tuesday, July 04, 2000
Reviewer:  Chris Kim
Score:
Page: 1/8

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